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Entries related to: risk-management

Preventing Crashes from Outside the Truck

There is nothing worse for a motor carrier than receiving a call that one of its drivers has been involved in a crash. Everything stops as you react to the situation and start gathering details about who was at fault and whether the driver could have prevented the incident. While drivers are ultimately responsible for the decisions they make behind the wheel, the root cause of a crash could run deeper. There could be mitigating factors within management’s operational control that are contributing to losses – or worse – have lulled the organization into a false sense of security if a loss has not occurred yet.
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Choosing the Correct Personal Protective Equipment for the Job

If a hazard cannot be removed or reduced to a point it can be considered an acceptable risk, personal protective equipment (PPE) can be used to provide an extra barrier of protection to workers. Keep in mind: PPE does not remove a particular hazard, but it can help to reduce the risk of injury or illness. PPE should always be worn in designated areas where PPE is required. Read the information below, and determine how PPE can better protect you from harm.
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Ask The Liability Adjuster: Do onboard cameras impact claims?

Great question! The Claims Department at Great West Casualty Company has seen an increase in the number of onboard video cameras used by insureds over the past few years, and that is a good thing. While the majority of devices in use are outward-facing cameras, the use of inward-facing cameras is on the rise, as well.
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Opening/Closing Trailer Doors

Opening and closing trailer doors are two of the leading causes of work-related injuries for truck drivers. Read the information below, and ask yourself if there are actions you can take to protect yourself from harm.
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Providing a Workplace Free of Known Hazards

Motor carriers are in a hazardous industry and face four types of loss exposures: financial, property, liability, and personnel. Financial exposures include decreases in revenue resulting from a loss, such as a vehicle crash, as well as increases in expenses. Damage to equipment or your facility are examples of property exposures, while liability exposures involve third-party claims. The final loss exposure category is the most important: personnel. The loss of any worker, especially key personnel, can cause significant business interruption. That is why a motor carrier should be mindful of its responsibility to provide a workplace that is free of known hazards.
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Monitoring Drivers for At-Risk Behaviors

According to a 2014 study by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), the average cost of all large truck crashes is approximately $91,000 per crash. That amount can increase exponentially if injuries and fatalities are involved. Avoiding the indirect costs associated with a loss, meaning the unbudgeted expenses not covered by insurance, is imperative. While the root cause of a crash may not be your driver, experience has shown that future crashes can be predicted based on leading indicators, such as a driver’s history of at-risk behaviors. These behaviors can include speeding, following too closely, and making frequent lane changes, to name a few. If a driver continues to exhibit these behaviors, then the chances of him/her being involved in a future crash is more likely.
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Disaster Planning: Plan and Protect Your Future

Is your organization prepared for a disaster or an emergency? Organizations who have a plan in place may recover more quickly, whereas others may shut their doors permanently after a short disruption to their business.  
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Seven Elements of Successful Risk Management

Senior leadership has many responsibilities, and one is to make sure the company operates at a profit. Certain performance metrics contribute to profitability such as annual sales growth, return on investment, and profit margin. Profit margin, in particular, can directly correlate to the effectiveness of the organization’s risk management strategy. Senior leadership’s role in championing this strategy begins with identifying the motor carrier’s loss exposures and devising a plan to mitigate or avoid potential losses. What does this look like? Here are seven elements of a successful risk management program that senior leaders can adopt.
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Broaden Your Fleet's Field of View with Fender-Mounted Mirrors

Lane change crashes pose a clear and present danger to motor carriers. The trucking industry has made commendable efforts to educate the public about avoiding blind spots around large trucks, but because of federal requirements mandating only two rear-vision mirrors on every tractor, it stands to reason that motor carriers should do more to expand the driver's field of view around the truck to help reduce the risk of a critical crash.
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Ask the Safety Rep: How OSHAs Working Surfaces Rule Affects Trucking

Walking-working surfaces pertains to floors, ladders, stairways, runways, dock boards, roofs, scaffolds, and elevated work surfaces and walkways. According to OSHA, "To protect workers from hazards associated with those surfaces, particularly hazards related to falls from elevations, the final rule updates and revises the general industry Walking-Working Surfaces standards (29 CFR part 1910, sub-part D)." The final rule provides employers with greater flexibility in choosing a fall protection system, including guardrails and safety net systems, and addresses other areas such as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and the requirements for training employees on fall hazards and fall protection systems. 
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