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Engage Drivers to Decrease Turnover

It is no secret that the trucking industry as a whole struggles with driver turnover. On average, drivers stay with their employers for only one year, and that turnover can cost a motor carrier approximately $8,200 each time a driver leaves, according to a recent study by McQuaig. Obviously, making a fair wage is important to drivers, but it may come as a surprise that not all drivers hop jobs for financial reasons. Even if the grass looks greener working for a competitor, company culture could be the root cause of driver dissatisfaction and turnover.
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Re-Emphasize Rear-End Crash Prevention

Preventing large truck crashes has been and always will be a topic of discussion motor carriers have with their drivers. Large truck crashes cost the transportation industry approximately $135 billion annually, according to a study conducted by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Rear-end crashes, in particular, have a high risk of causing catastrophic losses. The FMCSA’s study identified four driver-related factors associated with large truck crashes; these can also be factors in rear-end crashes. Read about each factor below and discuss them with your drivers to help re-emphasize your commitment to preventing rear-end crashes.
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FMCSA’s New Crash Preventability Determination Program

  Contributed by Dave Osiecki, Scopelitis Transportation Consulting LLC   Since the inception of the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) program at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), the trucking industry has been rightly concerned that its business partners would improperly use CSA scores to make business decisions. The scores, the trucking industry argued, were not an accurate depiction of a company’s safety posture.   
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Interpersonal Skills

  Interpersonal skills (aka soft skills) are character traits and behaviors we exhibit when interacting with other people. From your attitude and body language to the words you say, everyone must effectively deal with others to do their jobs successfully. Below is a list of common interpersonal skills. Read this information and determine how you can improve your soft skills.
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Share the Road

Many “Share the Road” initiatives speak to the drivers of passenger vehicles and focus on how to drive around large trucks, motorcyclists, etc. This approach is good to learn from, but truck drivers must also look at how they drive around others and practice similar techniques. Read the information below and ask yourself if there are actions you can take to Share The Road.
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What Motor Carriers Can Do To Prepare for Operation Safe Driver Week

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance campaign is set for July.  Here's how to make sure your drivers and staff are ready. From July 12-18, 2020, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) is conducting its Operation Safe Driver campaign throughout the United States and Canada. Motor carriers of all sizes must prepare for this event by educating themselves about what Operation Safe Driver Week means for their trucking operation.
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Do employees understand your business acumen?

 
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ATA issues Recommendations for Drivers in Areas of Unrest

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Understanding Roundabouts

Roundabouts can be dangerous for truck drivers, pedestrians, and the motoring public. Read the information below and ask yourself if there are actions you can take to improve your driving skills and reduce the risk of a crash when navigating a roundabout.
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Understanding the risks of obesity

Obesity and being overweight are two common health risks facing truck drivers. Obesity means having too much body fat, while a person can be overweight due to too much muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. If a person consumes more calories than he/ she burns, those extra calories are stored as fat. Over time, if life changes are not made, that excess body fat will continue to increase until a person reaches obesity. When that happens, there is an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, etc. The good news is that obesity is reversible in most cases, by eating and drinking smarter and increasing your physical activity. Consider the chart below and ask yourself where the majority of your daily calories are coming from.
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