Great West Casualty Company Blog

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Employee Fatigue is a Risk That Can be Managed

Sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, and insomnia are just a few sleep disorders that affect all employees, not only truck drivers. According to the National Safety Council (NSC), fatigue is a factor in 13 percent of workplace injuries, and “43 percent of Americans admit they may be too tired to function safely at work.” For motor carriers, a great deal of emphasis is placed on driver fatigue – and rightly so – but fatigue-related crashes and injuries are just part of the risk. Fatigue affects cognitive performance (i.e., short-term memory loss, concentration, etc.), work performance (i.e. decreased productivity, errors, etc.), personal health (i.e., depression, obesity, cardiovascular disease, etc.), and carries financial consequences such as increased health care costs.
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Drug and Alcohol Testing

The FMCSA’s Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse went into effect on Jan. 6. All drivers with a commercial driver’s license (CDL) or commercial learner’s permit (CLP) should be aware of how the Clearinghouse will impact them.H ere are some useful facts about the federal drug and alcohol testing requirements. Find more information at https://clearinghouse.fmcsa.dot.gov.
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Cold Weather Ailments

Cold weather can increase a person’s risk of contracting a virus, such as influenza, which can weaken your immune system and make it more difficult for your body to fight off germs. This weakened state can lead to a cold, the flu, sore throat, etc. Read the information below and determine what you can do to better protect yourself from common wintertime ailments.
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What Message Is Your Driver Screening Sending to Applicants?

With driver turnover being an issue for most motor carriers, coupled with the lack of new talent entering the industry, screening applicants remains critical to a motor carrier’s long-term success. Grossly mistaken are those companies clinging to the old-school mentality that simply filling an empty seat with a warm body will solve their driver shortage problem. In reality, motor carriers are likely contributing to their revolving door dilemma by hiring drivers who are prone to job hopping, have a history of risky behaviors (i.e., crashes and injuries), or simply do not mesh with their company culture.
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Ask the Physical Damage Claims Adjuster

WHAT TOWING RISKS EXIST IF MY TRUCK IS IN AN ACCIDENT AND I HAVE SPLIT COVERAGES? Having a driver involved in a crash is stressful in itself, but motor carriers may compound a bad situation if their liability, physical damage, and cargo coverages are split between multiple insurers. Splitting coverages invites confusion and communication breakdowns between parties involved. As a motor carrier anxiously awaits resolution of the claim, the disjointed parties involved must determine who has coverage for each claim and what the policy limits are, and then coordinate clean up, towing, salvage, and storage of cargo, to name a few tasks. Having one insurer handling all aspects of the claim is ideal. Avoiding split coverages for your operations can reduce the risk of unnecessary delays and inflated claim costs, and better protect the motor carrier from future litigation.
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Courageous Leaders Aren’t Afraid to Break a Few Eggs

On April 23, 1910, in Paris, France, Theodore Roosevelt delivered a speech that would come to be known as “The Man in the Arena.” In his address, Roosevelt touched on the courage it takes for a person to lead, to stand up, and to be a target for failure and ridicule in the face of progress. Roosevelt said, “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood...who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly.”
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5 things you need to know about the Drug & Alcohol Clearinghouse

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Improve Communication by Asking Better Questions

Have you ever run a report and questioned the results? You may have looked at the report, noted something about the data didn’t look right, researched further, and realized the data was bogus.
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The Difference between Fault and Preventability in a Crash

Fault and preventability are two terms motor carriers often confuse. The process of determining who was at fault in a collision is typically based on applicable motor vehicle laws and the actions of both drivers. Evidence will be collected and witness statements are taken so that fault can be determined, either by law enforcement or in a legal proceeding. Preventability, on the other hand, has a completely different meaning. According to the National Safety Council (NSC), “a preventable collision is a collision in which the driver failed to do everything reasonable to avoid it.” So, even if a truck driver is not cited for being at fault for an accident, the motor carrier could still deem the collision preventable.
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What to Do If a Load Is Rejected

A load can be rightfully rejected for several reasons, such as the goods were not delivered at the agreed-upon time or shifted in transit and were damaged. When a load is wrongfully rejected by the consignee, such as rejecting the load due to alleged temperature abuse, missing seals, etc., this can create an uncomfortable and stressful situation for your driver as he/she is left to deal with an unsatisfied customer. In many cases, drivers are not allowed on the dock, so they may not even get the chance to contest the allegation. In other cases, your driver may be gone before word arrives that the load was rejected.
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