Great West Casualty Company Blog

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Disaster Planning: Plan and Protect Your Future

Is your organization prepared for a disaster or an emergency? Organizations who have a plan in place may recover more quickly, whereas others may shut their doors permanently after a short disruption to their business.  
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Entering and Exiting Equipment

Slips, trips, and falls are one of the leading causes of workplace injuries. For drivers, these types of injuries commonly occur when improperly entering or exiting the cab and trailer. The results can be quite painful and in some cases, proven fatal. The key to avoiding slips, trips, and falls when entering and exiting equipment is to recognize the hazards that contribute to these injuries and know how to protect yourself from harm.
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Preventing Losses Through Regulatory Compliance

Those working in the transportation industry might rank regulatory compliance as their least favorite thing to do, right up there with getting a crown at the dentist, but like it or not, motor carriers must comply with the regulatory requirements to which they are subject. Failure to do so can result in penalties ranging from monetary fines, out-of-service orders, alerts on the company’s Safety Measurement System (SMS) profile, and, in severe cases, an order to cease operations.
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Spring Driving Hazards

Drastic weather changes, increased traffic, and the temptation to get out and get moving are springtime hazards drivers must prepare for. Drivers must be able to recognize these hazards and apply the right defenses. Read the information below, and ask yourself if there are actions you can take to improve your driving skills and reduce the risk of a crash.
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Crashes Do Happen: Tips on Driver Conduct at a Crash Scene

At some time in the future, you may be involved in a vehicle crash. These situations can be stressful and confusing. Before these situations occur, it is important that you understand driver conduct at a crash scene. Remember to be polite and courteous at the scene of a crash. Admit nothing, promise nothing, and do not argue. Do not discuss the crash with anyone except the police and representatives from your own company. Any statements you make may later be used against you; so do not offer any theories, reasons, or excuses to explain why the crash happened.
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Thou Shall Not Commit...Tailgating

It's one of the deadliest sins out there on the road. Most drivers are irritated by someone driving closely behind them. If the tailgater is pulling a fully loaded 18-wheeler, it not only causes anger, but also can be downright terrifying. Many motorists who have been tailgated by a truck driver spend the next several days cursing the whole industry to anyone that will listen.
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Elements of a Successful Safety Culture

Culture is a term used often when discussing organizational development, but what is it? Simply put, culture is the shared values and beliefs that govern how employees behave in an organization.
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Summary of the ATRI “Analysis of the Operational Costs of Trucking” 2017 Report

Every year since 2008, the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) has published “An Analysis of the Operational Costs of Trucking.” Last year’s report is now available; it contains helpful analysis in two areas of particular interest: high-level benchmarking of interest to motor carriers, and potential transportation impact assessments, of interest to public sector agencies.
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Ask the Liability Adjuster

Why is on-time reporting of liability claims important?
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Tips on Continuous Improvement Initiatives

Change is a constant in the trucking industry. From hours-of-service changes, the ELD mandate, and other proposed regulatory changes, this state of flux requires motor carriers to either rise to the challenge and improve or risk being left behind. Henry Ford once said, “If you always do what you always did, you always get what you always got.” Motor carriers cannot afford to adopt this mindset. Organizations either get better through continuous improvement efforts or get worse through stagnation as the industry continues to change around them.
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