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How Leadership Can Help Prevent Rear-End Crashes

Many factors contribute to rear-end crashes and several involve the decisions made behind the wheel by drivers. These decisions include determining proper following distance, adjusting speed with road conditions, avoiding distractions, and reacting properly to hazards. But there are other factors outside the cab that can also contribute to rear-end crashes, and those serving in leadership roles for a motor carrier play a critical role in helping prevent this type of critical crash.
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U.S. Supreme Court Rejects OOIDA’s ELD Appeal

On June 12, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that it will not hear the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association’s (OOIDA) appeal to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) ELD mandate. 
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Ask the Underwriter: How Driver Quality Affects Underwriting

  Great West Casualty Company’s underwriting guidelines are developed using data from industry studies and evaluating the MVRs of drivers involved in claims. American Transportation Research Institute, for example, conducted a study that found a reckless driving violation increases a driver’s crash risk by 325%. An improper turn increases crash risk by 105% and excessive speeding increases crash risk by 56%. Factors such as these, as well as years of experience and crash history, can all impact an Underwriter’s decision to insure a particular driver.
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Communication Techniques to Prevent Driver Distraction

Driver distraction is a major concern for motor carriers because it is a common factor associated with serious losses. Vehicle crashes are the obvious exposure, but whenever a driver gets pulled over for a distraction-related violation, that constitutes a business interruption. This in turn can equate to late deliveries, lost revenue, increased expenses, and poor public image based on SMS results.
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Avoiding Trip Injuries Around the Truck

RECOGNIZE THE HAZARDS Environment/Equipment Fuel hoses Pallets Trailer straps Loading dock stairs Low-stacked freight Clutter inside the cab Uneven walking surfaces Poor lighting
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Ask the Safety Rep: Drug Testing For Motor Carriers Who Lease Drivers

What is the new drug and alcohol testing rule for motor carriers who lease drivers from a staffing agency?
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How to Calculate Proper Following Distance Part 2

KNOW THE DEFENSE At 65 mph, a fully-loaded tractor-trailer requires a minimum of 665 feet of stopping distance. The most reliable method drivers use to gauge this distance is by counting seconds. To do this, pick a stationary object on the side of the road, like a road sign or overpass, and, as soon as the vehicle in front passes your chosen object, begin counting: “one-one-thousand, two-one-thousand…”. Continue counting until your vehicle reaches that stationary object.
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How to Calculate Proper Following Distance Part 1

Recognize the Hazards A key factor in rear-end crashes is improper following distance. In order to determine how much following distance is required to bring a tractor-trailer to a complete stop, drivers first need to know how much stopping distance their vehicle requires.
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Leadership's Role In Addressing Driver Distractions

Distractions, both inside the cab and out, are competing for the driver’s attention behind the wheel and increasing the risk of a crash. These distractions, in turn, expose motor carriers to potentially catastrophic losses involving personnel, equipment, revenue, and third-party liability claims. According to a 2015 survey by the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI), distractions are one of the top ten industry issues that concern motor carriers.
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2017 CVSA International Roadcheck Dates Announced

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) will hold its 30th annual International Roadcheck Enforcement Event from June 6-8, 2017. The event is the largest targeted enforcement program for commercial motor vehicles. During last year’s 3-day event, nearly 63,000 vehicles were inspected in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
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