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3 Ways Dash Cams Can Improve Your Operations

The transportation industry has seen a significant increase in technological advances over the past decade. From electronic logging devices and collision mitigation systems to trailer tracking and driver scorecards, technology now plays a key role in a motor carrier’s risk management strategies. One device becoming more prevalent in the trucking industry is the video event recorder.
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How to Create an Emergency Preparedness Plan For Your Trucking Company

No motor carrier ever wants to be involved in a vehicle-related incident or be pulled into a fraudulent claim. However, due to the high-risk nature of the transportation industry and our current litigious environment, both can happen. If you disagree, consider a recent study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In 2020, vehicle miles traveled decreased about 13.2 percent, but the fatality rate per million miles increased 23 percent compared to 2019. The NHTSA study also found the following: Occupant ejections were up 20 percent; Crashes on urban interstates were up 15 percent; Speeding-related crashes were up 11 percent; Rollover crashes were up 9 percent; and Police-reported alcohol involvement crashes were up 9 percent.
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Entry Level Driver Training Rule: New Requirements in 2022

HOW WILL MOTOR CARRIERS BE AFFECTED BY THE NEW ENTRY-LEVEL DRIVER TRAINING (ELDT) REGULATIONS? The new ELDT rule goes into effect on Feb. 7, 2022, and all motor carriers should be aware of the changes. First, the rule is not retroactive, meaning it does not apply to individuals who currently hold a valid commercial driver’s license (CDL) or have a passenger (P), school bus (S) or hazardous material (H) endorsement issued prior to Feb. 7, 2022.
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8 Must Ask Questions For your Truck Insurance Agent

People often look at the price of insurance in one of two ways: It’s a lot of money for a product you hope you never need, or it’s an investment in the protection of your assets and your livelihood. When it comes time to sit down with your agent to determine what coverage you need for your trucking operation, it’s important to understand exactly what your policy covers, what it does not cover, and what questions you should ask about your insurer’s value-added services. Use these four questions to start the conversation with your agent and download the free guide on 8 Must Ask Questions For Your Truck Insurance Agent.  
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Wear proper footwear to prevent injuries

Wearing protective footwear while working around the truck can help prevent injuries. From avoiding slips, trips, and falls to protecting against objects rolling onto or penetrating your feet, proper footwear is an essential piece of personal protective equipment. Improper footwear can also be uncomfortable and lead to calluses, ingrown toenails, etc. Read the information below and ask yourself how you can better protect yourself and your feet from injury.
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Protecting drivers from theft while on the road

Equipment and cargo thefts are constant risks for motor carriers. Thieves are always on the prowl, looking for easy targets. Read the information below and ask yourself if there are actions you can take to protect yourself from being a victim of theft.
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Give Safety Leaders a Seat at the Table

One mistake any person in a leadership role can make is to ignore or fail to realize the value each department brings to the organization. This can be especially true in siloed organizations where barriers exist that limit the effectiveness of communication between co-workers and departments. Barriers can be physical, cultural, or personal in nature. A physical barrier refers to being geographically separated, either across the country or even in the same building. Cultural barriers can include misunderstandings due to language or customs that may create communication breakdowns. However, this article speaks to company cultures that create barriers. As mentioned earlier, siloed organizations impede interdepartmental communication, whether intentionally or not. Finally, personal barriers involve individual attitudes and biases. A person may be reluctant to receive feedback or input from others for personal reasons. Whatever the case may be, a motor carrier’s leadership team cannot afford to make mission-critical decisions without input from every affected department. Whoever manages your safety and regulatory compliance efforts should have a seat at the table in every operational meeting involving department heads. Because transportation is a highly regulated, high-risk industry, who better to help department heads achieve their organizational objectives than safety? Preventing losses and managing risks should be top of mind in every business decision. If a motor carrier cannot operate safely, it is losing money. If it is losing money, the company cannot compete; and if the company cannot compete, it cannot survive. So, regardless of fleet size and organizational structure, senior management should view safety as one of the most important keys to the company’s long-term success. Here are two examples that show how safety can contribute to the discussion of trucking-related issues that motor carriers face on a daily basis.
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Safety Road Map: Tools to help you embrace compliance

Successful motor carriers who are subject to federal safety regulations embrace compliance as part of their overall risk management strategy. Failure to do so may result in unnecessary business interruptions (i.e., roadside inspections); preventable violations, which can damage a company’s reputation; and possibly monetary fines and penalties. Each of these outcomes has the potential to decrease revenue, increase expenses, or both, negatively impacting your bottom line and long-term sustainability. For those who are new to the regulations or are looking to self-assess their compliance efforts, Great West Casualty Company designed the Safety Road Map to help. In the “Regulatory Compliance” section are three tasks designed to aid your compliance efforts. If you have already completed these tasks, that’s great! Keep at it and look for other ways to improve. However, if you identify any gaps, consider these resources as you take corrective action.
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What are the safety advantages of using air disc brakes?

Air disc brakes (ADB) are now standard for many new trucks built after 2018 and can be ordered on either the steer or drive axles, or both. ADB can also be ordered for most trailer types. From a safety standpoint, ADB can help reduce the risk of rear-end crashes. According to Fleet Equipment Magazine, “The main strong point for disc brakes (over drum brakes) is reduced stopping distance. With disc brakes, that distance can be anywhere from 17% to 33% shorter than drum brakes, depending on speed.” Other advantages of using ADB include: No brake fade caused by heating up the brakes due to excessive usage. Generally less maintenance, although not maintenance-free. No slack-adjuster-related “out of adjustment” violations from roadside inspections. Longer life before replacement. Use of a caliper/pad mechanism, compared to the lining/drum/S-cam mechanism found on drum brakes. Consider the type of operation you run before choosing the equipment to best fit your needs.
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4 things you can do now to protect your company from cyberattacks

WHAT CAN I DO TO PROTECT MY COMPANY FROM CYBERATTACKS?
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